Minneapolis

Historical Floods

Minneapolis is a great city located in Minnesota, USA, and it forms twin cities with the St. Paul, a neighboring state capital separated by the Mississippi River. The city is well-known for its beautiful parks as well as lakes. In addition to that, the city is home to several cultural landmarks such as the contemporary art museum, the walker art center as well as the Minneapolis sculpture garden.

Despite being a lovely, Minneapolis has experienced several notorious floods along with other severe natural disasters. Fortunately, the city has managed to survive some of these destructive natural disasters. In this article, we shall be focusing on some notorious historical floods along with other natural disasters to ever happen in Minneapolis.

Notorious Flooding in Twin Cities

Several flooding incidences occurred in Minneapolis; however, we shall be focusing on the severe floods that damaged Minneapolis. The speed at which snow melts during springtime and the amount of rainfall that has fallen among other factors are variables responsible for the flooding.In 1849 the Minnesota Territory was formed, and St. Paul became its capital. The success of St. Paul was down to its natural geography, as this allowed traders to move their goods along the river quickly. The river valley has a series of stone bluffs, which line each side of the Mississippi River.

Spring flooding in 1965

In 1965, spring season started cold and snowy; however, it came to an end with a significant warm-up and increased rainfall resulting in record flooding in Minnesota. Minneapolis received 37.1 inches of snow, making it the 2nd all-time for March as well as the 4th snowiest month to ever been recorded. Meanwhile, St. Cloud was receiving an astonishing 51.7 inches of snow that March, which makes it the coldest March to ever been recorded and the snowiest month on record as well. By April 15th, Minnesota river has a crest of 719.40 ft. Which 17 ft. Above flood stage (702 ft.); in addition to that, it was 7 ft. Above the flood stage, which is 712 ft. On April 16th, the Mississippi River had a crest of 26.01 ft, which is 12 ft. above the flood stage. On the other hand, St. Croix River has a crest of 94.10 ft. The effect associated with this flood was experienced downstream within the Mississippi River. The flood did not only cause damage to Minneapolis and the state of Minnesota, but also affected other states, including Illinois, Wisconsin, and Missouri. Destruction was estimated to be approximately 4160million (with the current inflation, it is estimated to be $1.15 billion as of 2013). Fifteen people lost their lives, and 700 individuals were injured. More than 11,000 houses, along with several agricultural lands were lost to floods.

Twin Cities Superstorm 1987

This is the most significant rainfall event to ever occur in Twin Cities’ history. The rainfall began in the late evening of July 23rd, 1987. There were 10 inches of rain within 6 hours at Twin Cities International Airport; this resulted in massive flooding, particularly within the southern as well as the western part of Twin Cities Metro. This storm occurred within the frontal boundary that had separated cooler dry air in the south and west and warm and moist air to the south and east. When these two air masses interacted, it resulted in an intense thunderstorm along with very high rainfalls in the southern part of the Twin Cities. By April 15th, Minnesota river has a crest of 719.40 ft. Which 17 ft. Above flood stage (702 ft.); in addition to that, it was 7 ft. Above the flood stage, which is 712 ft. On April 16th, the Mississippi River had a crest of 26.01 ft, which is 12 ft. above the flood stage. On the other hand, St. Croix River has a crest of 94.10 ft. The effect associated with this flood was experienced downstream within the Mississippi River. The flood did not only cause damage to Minneapolis and the state of Minnesota, but also affected other states, including Illinois, Wisconsin, and Missouri. Destruction was estimated to be approximately 4160million (with the current inflation, it is estimated to be $1.15 billion as of 2013). Fifteen people lost their lives, and 700 individuals were injured. More than 11,000 houses, along with several agricultural lands were lost to floods.